Lessons Learned

"Things I would do differently . . . "

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After having completed the project, I though about all of the lessons I had learned.  I gave thought as to what I would do differently.  I want to share these thoughts with you now:

Painted Hull
In regards to painting:
When I painted the hull, I used thinner very sparingly.  Each coat got a bit more, but slight brush strokes were still visable.  By the time I reached the deck, I was pouring the thinner in, and it flatten out perfectly.
LESSON:
TEST THE THINNED PAINT FIRST!!!
In regards to the boat itself:
Look at the boat you are purchasing; does it need a lot of work to make it sailable?  Do you want to commit to a large project?
Everyone is constrained by their budget, but try to find a happy medium to get you in the water quickly.
LESSON:
SAVE YOUR MONEY, BUY A NICE BOAT THAT DOESN'T NEED WORK - GO SAILING!
Javelin1
Javelin
In regards to work location:
Try to work indoors in a shop.  The project won't be dictated by the weather!  I would have been finished much sooner if I had a garage!  Also, painting will be easier - the bugs love wet paint!
LESSON:
BEG, BORROW, OR DO WHAT YOU CAN TO WORK INDOORS!
In regards to transom rot:
The infamous Javelin transom rot!  I know that Javelin owners try products that can be injected in the core, then solidify.  I went with a new core.  I do not want to ever do this again.
LESSON:
IF YOU ARE GOING TO REPAIR, DO IT RIGHT!!!
New Dry Core
Mainsheet Block Mainsheet Cleat

In regards to fittings and rigging:
When I first started the project, I thought that the old fittings looked very classic.  They were the old phenolic blocks, and they did not run smoothly.  I slowly decided to replace the blocks and fittings with more modern pieces.  The boat is still a classic, but it is more of a pleasure to sail with more efficient parts!
LESSON:
SPEND THE EXTRA EFFORT TO OUTFIT THE BOAT FOR THE TYPE OF SAILING YOU WANT TO DO!

Mainsail
In regards to sails:
The sails are your motors - make sure they are in good shape.  An old boat usually means you will also get old sails.  Figure the sail replacement costs into your project.  Depending on the boat, they could add up quickly!
Also, determine the type of sailing you will be doing; cruising, day sailing, or racing.  The type of sailing will determine the type of sails you need.
LESSON:
DO NOT SKIMP ON THE SAILS!  THEY DRIVE YOUR BOAT!
In regards to the trailer:
I got lucky with my trailer - it didn't need a lot of work.  Make sure that your trailer supports the boat correctly, and you can launch and retrieve the boat easily.
LESSON:
MAKE SURE THE BOAT FITS THE TRAILER!  A BAD TRAILER CAN NOT ONLY RUIN YOUR DAY, BUT YOUR BOAT!
Painted New Boards
Chainplate Reinforcement
In regards to modifications:
Just because the boat comes out of the factory a certain way doesn't mean that it is correct.  Here I reinforced the chainplates with a plate on the outer hull.  The original set-up caused the deck to crack around the chainplate.
LESSON:
MAKE THE BOAT SAFER, STONGER, AND EASIER TO SAIL!
Bent Mast Bent Mast at Deck

In regards to knowledge:
Make sure you know what you are doing!  I had attached the spreaders to the shrouds with rigging tape (not wire!).  This wasn't as much of an issue with the mast in one piece.  When the tabernacle was installed it was a real problem.  During heavy winds, the spreader pulled away from the shroud, letting the mast move and bending it.  Luckily I had an experienced sailor help straighten the mast (after 3 hours of work!).
LESSON:
KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING!

Jib Cleat Fairleads 1

In regards to placement of fittings:
Make sure you place fittings in the correct alignment and position.  I learned after the first few sails that the jib cleats would let loose under strain in heavy winds.  I had thought the alignment to the blocks in the jib tracks were correct.  The alignment was correct, but the angles were off up and down - the line came down to the cleats at an angle, and the cleats were mounted flat.

The solution was to mount a fairlead in front of the cleats!  Problem solved!
LESSON:
BE AWARE THAT YOU MAY NEED TO MOVE THINGS OR MAKE CORRECTIONS AFTER THE BOAT IS "COMPLETE"!

In regards to trial & error:
I had decided to leave the hole for the centerboard pin (used during trailering).  After sailing, I found air and water would spit on my legs!
The trailer has rollers that support the centerboard, so the hole wasn't really needed.  I plugged the hole with a small cork, and sealed with silicone.
LESSON:
MAKE THESE CHOICES BEFORE FINAL PAINTING!

These are just some of the thoughts I have had.  Overall, my advise is to look carefully at what is needed to be done to your boat.  Is it worth it?  Is is cheaper in the long run to buy another boat?
I happen to enjoy the process of a restoration, others would rather sail - what is your preference?